Monday, 20 May 2019

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Losing inches but not losing weight?

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Health Desk----21 May, 2016: For too many of us, weight isn’t just a number but something that can actually change how we feel about ourselves.

But, what does your weight really mean and how useful is it when it comes to tracking weight loss progress? Learning the answers to those questions may just have you tossing out your scale forever.

Focus on fat loss, not weight loss

When you talk about losing weight, what you usually mean is slimming down. But slimming down doesn’t always mean losing weight. It may sound odd, but it’s possible to get thinner without actually seeing a change in your weight. This happens when you lose body fat while gaining muscle. Your weight may stay the same, even as you lose inches, a sign that you’re moving in the right direction.

The truth about your weight

If you think about it, that number doesn’t tell you a whole lot. The scale shows your weight, but does it tell you how much of that weight is muscle and how much is fat? Or how much of that weight is water, bones or organs? A bodybuilder’s weight could be off the charts because of extra muscle, but does that mean he’s overweight or fat?

Should you throw out the scale?

You now know that focusing on fat loss is much more important than focusing on your weight. When you lose body fat, you’re making permanent changes in your body, shifting your body composition so that you have less fat and more muscle.

When you lose weight, you could be losing water or even muscle. It’s impossible to know if you’re seeing real results or just the product of your daily habits, hormonal shifts and changing hydration levels.

Change how you measure your success

Even if you’re not ready to stop weighing yourself entirely, using other ways to measure progress can keep yourself motivated and help you realize that you are making changes, no matter what the scale says.

Go by how your clothes fit. If they fit more loosely, you know you’re on the right track. Take your measurements to see if you’re losing inches.

Losing inches but not losing weight?

Health Desk----21 May, 2016: For too many of us, weight isn’t just a number but something that can actually change how we feel about ourselves.

But, what does your weight really mean and how useful is it when it comes to tracking weight loss progress? Learning the answers to those questions may just have you tossing out your scale forever.

Focus on fat loss, not weight loss

When you talk about losing weight, what you usually mean is slimming down. But slimming down doesn’t always mean losing weight. It may sound odd, but it’s possible to get thinner without actually seeing a change in your weight. This happens when you lose body fat while gaining muscle. Your weight may stay the same, even as you lose inches, a sign that you’re moving in the right direction.

The truth about your weight

If you think about it, that number doesn’t tell you a whole lot. The scale shows your weight, but does it tell you how much of that weight is muscle and how much is fat? Or how much of that weight is water, bones or organs? A bodybuilder’s weight could be off the charts because of extra muscle, but does that mean he’s overweight or fat?

Should you throw out the scale?

You now know that focusing on fat loss is much more important than focusing on your weight. When you lose body fat, you’re making permanent changes in your body, shifting your body composition so that you have less fat and more muscle.

When you lose weight, you could be losing water or even muscle. It’s impossible to know if you’re seeing real results or just the product of your daily habits, hormonal shifts and changing hydration levels.

Change how you measure your success

Even if you’re not ready to stop weighing yourself entirely, using other ways to measure progress can keep yourself motivated and help you realize that you are making changes, no matter what the scale says.

Go by how your clothes fit. If they fit more loosely, you know you’re on the right track. Take your measurements to see if you’re losing inches.

Set performance goals. Instead of worrying about weight loss or fat loss, focus on completing a certain number of workouts each week or competing in a race.