Monday, 23 Apr 2018

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High protein intake may not benefit older men

No icon Amar Doctor

Health Desk: 03 April 2018: Turns out, having more protein than the recommended dietary allowance may not benefit older men.

According to a study conducted by Brigham and Women's Hospital, older men who consumed more protein than the recommended dietary allowance did not see increases in lean body mass, muscle performance, physical function or other well-being measures.

Regardless of whether an adult is young or old, male or female, their recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein, set by the Institute of Medicine, is the same: 0.8-g/kg/day.

Many experts and national organizations recommend dietary protein intakes greater than the recommended allowance to maintain and promote muscle growth in older adults. However, few rigorous studies have evaluated whether higher protein intake among older adults provides meaningful benefit.

"It's amazing how little evidence there is around how much protein we need in our diet, especially the value of high-protein intake," said corresponding author Bhasin.

A randomized, clinical trial conducted by Brigham and Women's Hospital investigator Shalender Bhasin and colleagues has found that higher protein intake did not increase lean body mass, muscle performance, physical function or other well-being measures among older men.

The clinical trial, known as the Optimizing Protein Intake in Older Men (OPTIMen) Trial, was a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial in which men aged 65 or older were randomized to receive a diet containing 0.8-g/kg/day protein and a placebo injection; 1.3-g/kg/day protein and a placebo injection; 0.8-g/kg/day protein and a weekly injection of testosterone; or 1.3-g/kg/day protein and a weekly injection of testosterone.

The team found that protein intake greater than the RDA had no significant effect on lean body mass, fat mass, muscle performance, physical function, fatigue or other well-being measures.

The study appears in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.